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Carve The Sky -- Alexander Jablokov Print
Written by Mike Noel   
Wednesday, 01 October 2008

Carve The Sky

What a fun and clever sci-fi story. In some ways this is better characterized as a mystery set in a science fiction universe.  Jablokov creates a believable world set about 400 years in the future.  By then humanity has moved off of the terrestial sphere and now people live on the moon, mars, some asteroids in the belt, and some even spend their entire life aboard large space ships that shuttle between the various bodies in the solar system.

Carve The Sky intertwines the complex worlds of art collecting (even 400 years from now), interplanetary espionage, and eclectic religions.  Throughout it the mystery of the enigmatic character Ozaki is revealed.  An accomplished sculpture, Ozaki killed himself when at the peak of his work.  Ozaki's latest works, however, contained a clue to a rare and valuable new element in the universe.  Following the clues leads to a continually unravelling story with many unexpected twists.  The finale is quite satisfying.

One aspect of science fiction that bothers me is the disdain that most science fiction has towards religion.  It almost seems that most authors see no value at all in religion in human history and therefore can only write about religion as some overly oppresive force in future societies.   This book handles it differently.  Religion is not negative.  It is, instead, a valid part of many of the characters' lives.  Of course, the religion in this book is a barely recognizable descended from 20th century religions.  But at least the author wasn't simply rehashing the same old anti-religion themes like other authors.

 

Last Updated ( Wednesday, 01 October 2008 )
 

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